Digital library on sustainable finance

THEME

REPORT TYPE

LANGUAGE

YEAR

 – 

REGION

TITLE

AUTHOR

PUBLISHED

LANGUAGES

TITLE 10 for 2018: ESG Risks on the Horizon
AUTHOR Sustainalytics
PUBLISHED Feb 2018
LANGUAGES EN 
More

Summary

The report examines critical ESG risks in 10 sectors, which are classified under four broad themes, including: Water Management, Climate Change, Stakeholder Governance and Consumer Protection. Based on this analysis, many of these issues will potentially reach a tipping point and might pose a threat to shareholder value in the year ahead. For every theme the study contains at least one example from industry players. This story selections are meant to provoke new thinking about risk and sector attractiveness, particularly over the long run.

Link

TITLE A practical guide to active ownership in listed equity
AUTHOR Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI)
PUBLISHED Feb 2018
LANGUAGES EN 
More

Summary

Active ownership is generally regarded as one of the most effective mechanisms to reduce risks, maximise returns and have a positive impact on society and the environment – for passive and active investors. This publication provides an overview of the steps investors should consider to develop their active ownership policies and practices, with the ultimate goal of understanding corporate ESG risks and opportunities, defining their expectation for higher business performance and raising standards in the listed equity market. The aim of the guide is to offer all PRI signatories with practical tools, global best practices and references to be co-owners of investee companies and catalysts of change when needed. 

Link

TITLE Asset owner Guide on Coal and Renewable Electric Power Utilities
AUTHOR WWF
PUBLISHED Jan 2018
LANGUAGES EN 
More

Summary

There is a growing consensus amongst leading investors globally that we are moving irreversibly towards a low carbon economy. With this Guide, WWF wishes to support asset owners and show how they can align their electric power sector investments with the objectives set in the Paris Agreement. The Guide focuses on coal and renewable power: such focus does not stem from a disregard of the challenges in gas power or heating, but from the recognition that coal and renewables offer both the most visible and urgent climate-related risks and opportunities to asset owners.

Link

TITLE Understanding Female Investors - Women using capital to change the world
AUTHOR Moxie Future
PUBLISHED Jan 2018
LANGUAGES EN 
More

Summary

Moxie future has launched the first survey specialising on the responsible investment behaviour of women and the barriers they face. The survey was answered by 2536 women in Australia, China, Germany, UK and US, whereof respondents from China showed the highest interest in responsible investing. Also, 83% care about where their money is invested, 69% feel a sense of urgency to invest responsibly, and 63% are motivated to be responsible investors.

Link

TITLE Financing Sustainable Land Use - Unlocking business opportunities in sustainable land use with blended finance
AUTHOR KOIS Invest
PUBLISHED Jan 2018
LANGUAGES EN 
More

Summary

This KOIS Invest report, comissioned by the Blended Finance Task Force, finds that private investment is not at the scale needed to tackle the sustainable land use (SLU) that comes with growing demand for food and energy. There needs to be a paradigm shift in the way in which (i) private sector investors view investment opportunities in SLU and how (ii) public and philanthropic investors engage to catalyse private capital in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The most common refrain in SLU is the lack of ‘investable’ project opportunities, even though they exist, in the form of early-stage SLU venture capital investments. To make the risk level more palatable to investors, collaboration with public finance institutions - a blended finance approach - is essential.

Link

TITLE Blended Finance in Clean Energy: Experiences and Opportunities
AUTHOR Climate Policy Initiative
PUBLISHED Jan 2018
LANGUAGES EN 
More

Summary

This Climate Policy Initiative report, comissioned by the Blended Finance Task Force, analyses opportunities where blended finance can mobilise large scale private capital for clean energy. It evaluates, by geography and clean energy sector, the most significant opportunities for impact on both climate change and energy access per dollar invested; the risks and barriers that prevent investment; and how blended finance could be deployed to address investor needs. The report finds the greatest opportunities for blended finance in clean energy are in Sub-Saharan Africa and South and East Asia, with a subset of eight countries alone offering more than USD 360bn in investment potential in clean energy by 2030.

Link

TITLE Who is the private sector? Key considerations for mobilizing institutional capital through blended finance
AUTHOR Convergence
PUBLISHED Jan 2018
LANGUAGES EN 
More

Summary

The Blended Finance Taskforce commissioned Convergence to support in segmenting the private sector ecosystem for getting a better understanding how to drive more institutional investment towards the Global Goals in developing countries. This resulting report provides ananalysis of the investment motivations, requirements, and constraints of six segments of institutional investors: I) pension funds, ii) insurance companies, iii) sovereign wealth funds, iv) commercial banks and investment banks, v) private equity firms, and vi) asset/wealth managers. Blended finance structures must create assets that fit within the mandates, constraints, and risk-adjusted return preferences of each institutional investor segment.

Link

TITLE Better Finance, Better World
AUTHOR Blended Finance Taskforce
PUBLISHED Jan 2018
LANGUAGES EN 
More

Summary

The flagship report of the Blended Finance Taskforce created by the Business and Sustainable Development Commission presents the perspective of the private sector towards Blended Finance. The report offers five key take-aways:

  1. Momentum is building around the $50+ billion blended finance market.
  2. There is a window of opportunity for private institutional investors.
  3. The MDBs and DFIs will be critical to scaling the blended finance market and can do so by setting ambitious targets to mobilise external private finance.
  4. Developing countries which generate high quality infrastructure assets will not be short of financing.
  5. There is a major opportunity for the world to increase its underlying rate of growth, deliver the Sustainable Development Goals (including climate) and strengthen long-term returns for savers.

Link

TITLE Making Blended Finance Work for the Sustainable Development Goals
AUTHOR OECD
PUBLISHED Jan 2018
LANGUAGES EN 
More

Summary

The report provides a thorough assessment of the current state and priorities for blended finance for achieving the SDGs. It argues that while blending has potential to scale up commercial finance, its deployment by the development finance community needs to be based on a common framing and principles, as well as additional evidence and analysis. Therefore, the report describes concepts and definitions, lays out the main actors and instruments and shares learnings from past experiences.

Link

TITLE Mobilizing private wealth for public good
AUTHOR UBS
PUBLISHED Jan 2018
LANGUAGES EN 
More

Summary

The UBS whitepaper constitutes a blueprint for directing private capital towards the SDGs. It points out the specific SDGs where private wealth can play a larger role, which are zero hunger; quality education; good health and well being; affordable and clean energy; industry, innovation and infrastructure; and climate action. Yet, in order to attract the needed investment the transparency of data ought to be increased to facilitate the identification of investment opportunities.

Link

TITLE Financing a Sustainable European Economy - Final Report
AUTHOR High-Level Expert Group on Sustainable Finance (HLEG)
PUBLISHED Jan 2018
LANGUAGES EN 
More

Summary


In this final report, the HLEG makes eight recommendations to be considered by the Commission to improve the contribution of the financial system to sustainable and inclusive growth. Those are:

  1. establishing an EU sustainability taxonomy, starting with climate mitigation;
  2. clarifying investor duties to extend the time horizons of investment and bring greater focus on environmental, social and governance (ESG) factors into investment decisions;
  3. upgrading disclosures to make sustainability opportunities and risks transparent;
  4. empowering and connecting Europe’s citizens with sustainable finance issues;
  5. developing official European sustainability standards for some financial assets, starting with green bonds;
  6. establishing ‘Sustainable Infrastructure Europe’ to deploy development capacity in EU member states for infrastructure necessary for a more sustainable economy;
  7. reforming governance and leadership of companies to build sustainable finance competencies;
  8. and integrating sustainability firmly in the governance of financial institutions as well as in financial supervision.

Link

TITLE Social Impact Bonds – ein Leitfaden für die Praxis
AUTHOR seif and BHP Brugger und Partner AG
PUBLISHED Jan 2018
LANGUAGES DE 
More

Summary

This document gives a explanation of Social impact bonds and provides the reader with a historical perspective on the investment vehicle. Furthermore it describes current best practices as well as difficult experiences with regards to Social Impact Bonds (SIBs) in a European environment. With this German publication, authors hope to initiate a discussion on both the risks an opportunities of issuing SIBs in Switzerland.

Link

TITLE Swiss Legal and Tax Implications of Social Impact Bonds
AUTHOR Brunschwig & Fischer
PUBLISHED Jan 2018
LANGUAGES EN 
More

Summary

This research maps out the legal implications of launching a Social Impact Bond (SIB) in Switzerland as well as its taxation. Since Swiss issuances are still lacking for reference, the authors provide learnings of a recent SIB project by the International Committee of the Red Cross supported by SECO, amongst other donors.

Link

TITLE Understanding ESG Incidents: Key Lessons for Investors
AUTHOR Sustainalytics
PUBLISHED Jan 2018
LANGUAGES EN 
More

Summary

Based on analysis of over 29,000 incidents that took place from 2014 to 2016, the report identifies prominent incident categories, where incidents are occurring, and which industries are most involved. The report also considers how incident analysis can be integrated into portfolio strategy, including industry tilts, beta analysis and security selection, as well as corporate engagement processes.

Sustainalytics’ incident collection framework covers 45 incident categories and 60,000 sources of information worldwide, and provides comprehensive insight into company activities that generate undesirable social or environmental effects. The key findings from Sustainalytics’ report include:

  • Quality and safety and business ethics are the two most common ESG incident types, accounting for 30 percent of all incidents;
  • The banking industry accounts for 19 percent of all incidents, more than twice the amount of the next most exposed industry (food products);
  • Adjusting for differences in industry size, the automobile industry is the most incident prone, and real estate is the least; and
  • Over 40 percent of incidents occur in the U.S., the highest concentration of any country.

Link

TITLE Global Landscape of Renewable Energy Finance 2018
AUTHOR International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) and Climate Policy Initiative (COI)
PUBLISHED Jan 2018
LANGUAGES EN 
More

Summary

This publication provides a concise, accessible summary of finance flows to renewables around the world. The study examines finance flows worldwide in 2013-2016, broken down by technology, financial instrument and region. 


Although investment in renewables dipped in dollar terms in 2016-2017, they have continued to gain ground against conventional energy sources, particularly for new power plants. The report finds that private sources provide the bulk of renewable energy investment globally – over 90% in 2016. Conventional debt and equity are the most prominent financing instruments

Download

IRENA_Global_landscape_RE_finance_2018 (pdf 3.6 MB)
TITLE WWF climate guide to asset owners: aligning investment portfolios with the Paris Agreement
AUTHOR WWF
PUBLISHED Dec 2017
LANGUAGES DE  EN 
More

Summary

WWF works with many stakeholders to tackle the challenge that climate change presents. With this Climate Guide to Asset Owners, WWF wishes to support asset owners and show how they can align their investments with the objectives set in the Paris Climate Change Agreement (‘Paris Agreement’). This document is structured to assist asset owners in their efforts to address climate change. It demonstrates that the financial evidence and regulatory environment have created a favourable context for taking action on climate change; and that asset owners can count and build on extensive strategic advice and existing good practice from peers. On that basis, WWF presents operational recommendations on how asset owners can accelerate their progress and seek to achieve carbon mitigation in line with the Paris Agreement. The document ends with the next steps planned by WWF.

Read English summary here

WWF works with many stakeholders to tackle the challenge that climate changepresents. With this Climate Guide to Asset Owners, we wish to support assetowners and show how they can align their investments with the objectives set inthe Paris Climate Change Agreement (‘Paris Agreement’).WWF recognises that addressing climate change is a multi-year effort, and thatasset owners are at different stages on this path. Yet the pace and scale of actionrequired to comply with the Paris Agreement does not leave room forprocrastination: the cost of the transition increases with every year of inaction.This document is structured to assist asset owners in their efforts toaddress climate change. It demonstrates that the financial evidence andregulatory environment have created a favourable context for taking action onclimate change; and that asset owners can count and build on extensive strategicadvice and existing good practice from peers. On that basis, WWF presentsoperational recommendations on how asset owners can accelerate their progressand seek to achieve carbon mitigation in line with the Paris Agreement.The document ends with the next steps planned by WWF.

Link

TITLE Banking on a Low-Carbon Future
AUTHOR ShareAction UK
PUBLISHED Dec 2017
LANGUAGES EN 
More

Summary

This ShareAction UK report captures the current state of the European banking sector’s response to climate-related risk and the low-carbon transition. It aims to provide share- and bondholders in the 15 largest European banks with an overview of where the sector is positioned on climate-related risks and opportunities. The report is structured around four key areas:

  1. Climate-related risk assessment and management
  2. Low-carbon products and services
  3. Public policy engagement and collaboration with other actors on climate change
  4. Governance structures and strategy on climate-related risks and opportunities

Link

TITLE Accelerating Financial Centre Action on Sustainable Development
AUTHOR UNEP Inquiry
PUBLISHED Dec 2017
LANGUAGES EN 
More

Summary

The UNEP Inquiry has published this report with the official launching of the international network for Financial Centres for Sustainability. The report maps out the action areas, as well as strategic priorities which the group will address in the following years.

Link

TITLE Investment Consultant Services Review
AUTHOR Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI)
PUBLISHED Dec 2017
LANGUAGES EN 
More

Summary

The PRI has published this review with the aim to drive a deeper discussion in the industry about the inclusion of ESG issues as a standard part of consulting advice and which additional ESG integration investment services are needed. The report also sets out barriers to this practice and identifies preliminary interventions.

Link

TITLE Responding to megatrends: investment institutions trend index 2017
AUTHOR PRI & Willis Towers Watson
PUBLISHED Dec 2017
LANGUAGES EN 
More

Summary

This report outlines the key megatrends that are impacting the global economy, financial system and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Over the past several months the authors have engaged with PRI signatories, market participants and other key stakeholders to gauge investor responses and strategies for dealing with current and future outcome volatility caused by the megatrends. The study finds that technological advances and environmental changes are seen as the most impactful global megatrends that represent major opportunities and threats to investment institutions. However it also shows that social inequality and global capital flow issues, including public sector deficits, emerge as rival concerns for senior global investment industry figures.

Link

TITLE Paper on the Implications of UN Guiding Principles 13b & 17 in a Corporate and Investment Banking Context
AUTHOR Thun Group of Banks
PUBLISHED Dec 2017
LANGUAGES EN 
More

Summary

This paper builds on the requirements for sound due diligence as explained in the Thun Group of Banks' 2013 Discussion Paper and focuses on situations where banks may be directly linked to negative human rights impacts under UNGP 13b of the UNGPs. It further clarifies the interpretation of UNGP 13a, and specifies that the Paper was drafted from the perspective that financial institutions will generally be directly linked in the case of adverse human rights impacts (UNGP 13b). 

Link

TITLE Benchmarking the greenness of financial centres
AUTHOR Climate-KIC
PUBLISHED Dec 2017
LANGUAGES EN 
More

Summary

In this first benchmarking, Climate-KIC, I4CE and PwC compare the financial centres of G7 countries: Frankfurt (Germany), London (United Kingdom), Milan (Italy), New York (United States), Paris (France), Tokyo (Japan) and Toronto (Canada). The main indicators were transparency of information; availability of green finance; green intensity; integrity of green finance; and the dynamics of the green financial centres. Though working with partial data only the report attempts to highlight the strong points of certain financial centres with respect to developing green finance. This first benchmark shows that green finance is currently traceable mainly through stock exchanges and notably via green bonds. A first conclusion is the need of diversifying green financial products and of developing their traceability and comparability at an international level. This concerns mainly green lending, private equity, insurance and green investment funds.

Link

TITLE Global and European Green Finance Policy Directory
AUTHOR Global Green Finance Council
PUBLISHED Dec 2017
LANGUAGES EN 
More

Summary

The purpose of this directory is to provide policymakers and global and regional market participants a simple, easy-to-use reference guide as to which international and regional governments and industry bodies have implemented or are implementing major initiatives on green, sustainability and climate change.

Link

TITLE The State of Impact Measurement and Management Practice
AUTHOR Global Impact Investing Network (GIIN)
PUBLISHED Dec 2017
LANGUAGES EN 
More

Summary

This report presents findings from the GIIN’s first comprehensive survey of the state of impact measurement and management (IMM) in the impact investing industry. It captures data from 169 impact investing organizations to provide valuable insights into why impact investors measure and manage their social and environmental impact, how they do so, and challenges that remain. By providing critical data and transparency regarding IMM practice, this report enables investors to better understand this core element of impact investing.

Link

TITLE Handbook on Sustainable Investments
AUTHOR Swiss Sustainable Finance (SSF)
PUBLISHED Dec 2017
LANGUAGES EN 
More

Summary

Swiss Sustainable Finance has prepared a handbook on sustainable investments for Swiss institutional asset owners. One year after the publication of the handbook in German and French, SSF updated and translated the publication into English.

The handbook contains relevant information for institutional asset owners and consists of 21 chapters, 8 case studies, a glossary, and over 30 visuals. It offers a comprehensive overview of the various available sustainable investment strategies and it contains concrete tips helpful in implementing a sustainable investment policy. 

Link

Showing 101 - 125 of 351 Reports

Login for Members

Incorrect username or password. Please try again or send email to